Potassium argon dating vs carbon dating

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Radiocarbon is not used to date the age of rocks or to determine the age of the earth.Other radiometric dating methods such as potassium-argon or rubidium-strontium are used for such purposes by those who believe that the earth is billions of years old.one of the most widely used is potassium-argon dating (k-ar dating).

wasserburg, "transfer of helium, neon, argon, and xenon through a steady-state upper mantle," geochimica et cosmochimica acta, 59 (1995): pp.Some organic materials do give radiocarbon ages in excess of 50,000 "radiocarbon years." However, it is important to distinguish between "radiocarbon years" and calendar years.These two measures of time will only be the same if all of the assumptions which go into the conventional radiocarbon dating technique are valid.It is, therefore, not surprising that many misconceptions about what radiocarbon can or cannot do and what it has or has not shown are prevalent among creationists and evolutionists - lay people as well as scientists not directly involved in this field.In the following article, some of the most common misunderstandings regarding radiocarbon dating are addressed, and corrective, up-to-date scientific creationist thought is provided where appropriate. Radiocarbon is used to date the age of rocks, which enables scientists to date the age of the earth.

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